Monday, August 13, 2012

Joe Kubert (1926–2012) / Map of Doom

Celebrating a life of amazing, masterful artistry, (read more HERE) today we have an encore presentation of my favorite Joe Kubert precode horror tale-- originally posted here at THOIA back in Nov. 2007, from the Oct. '53 issue of Weird Horrors #9.












Joe Kubert
(1926 – 2012)

8 comments:

Mestiere said...

Less than two weeks ago I had looked up his biography on Wikipedia and was surprised to see that he was still alive. He was great.

Brian Barnes said...

Another great leaves us. Kubert was working pretty steady up until the end and gave us great work his entire career.

Every time we loose one of these guys, I just think about Ghastly; such a short career. He was alive for many decades after that but there had basically left comics (and fame) because of the hearings.

Now I'm depressed. RIP, Joe.

Mr. Cavin said...

I read this in your archive yesterday and I was surprised just how much it reminded me of Ditko's old pre-code horror stuff for Charlton. (That "No! No! It can't be!" panel from the middle of page four, for example. Or the splash, frankly.) Certainly some of this is because of the coloring, and most of it is probably because Ditko was evolving hard from one job to the next back then, and in the process his work managed to look like a lot of different things. But still. Not all of this early work remind me of what Kubert settled on, either.

Incredible work though.

Mykal Banta said...

Excellent tribute to one of the finest comic book artists that ever put ink to paper. His like are few and far between.

HEH said...

Such sad news, but such a great story post. Joe Kubert will be greatly missed.

Karswell said...

Thanks for the comments here everyone, the Kubert tributes I saw all over the web for the last few days are a true testiment to what Joe meant to the world of comics, and he'll never be forgotten.

SATAN JOE IS HERE NOW said...

another sould into the pitts of HELL WHAT A LOSS

Frank Forte said...

This is a great piece of early Kubert comic work. You can see he's still developing his style, but there are signature brush moves that can be seen in the 60's and 70's DC pages. So many artists got their start in horror comics. I wonder if these guys liked horror or loathed it. Kubert seemed like he just wanted to tell great stories. PLUS--he did sign his name--many artists didn't--so he was obviously wanting credit. Really great compositions in the panels--great close ups of fingers. The limited color panels work great while others are a mixed match of these garish/strange choices--they must have been thinking these choices would add to the uneasy feelings they hoped the reader would get. or maybe they just had limited colors and were surprised when they saw the print version from what was separated in the pre print color seps. Either way it's great to look at.