Wednesday, March 28, 2012

The Slipped Mickey Click Flip

Concluding our Creepy Fest with one from Corban and Moench, from the July 1973 issue of Creepy #54. THOIA friend Trevor M sends over the scans plus an intro: "...for me the greatest masterpiece ever published by Warren, in my subjective opinion, was this surrealist story -- which certainly generated the most mail they ever got. It was also featured in the crusty professor John Adkin's Richardson's seminal cartooning book: Complete Book of Cartooning. Along with the singular Eisner page, it completely focused all us serious students on greatness possible in cartooning."  Enjoy creeps! We'll see ya in April...










8 comments:

downtown guy said...

I'd just like to say thank you for doing this blog. Today's was pretty amazing.

Karswell said...

Thank you DT! And another big thanks to Trev for sending me these scans too!

Helvetica said...

I was probably fifteen when I first read this. I don't remember much about it, although page five has been burned into my grey-matter forever. For some reason, that demented "Little Engine That Could" creeped me RIGHT out.

Corben rules!

Trevor M said...

May the Click-lick Express haunt you all in your nightmares!

Dr. Theda said...

My favorite story!!! took me years to locate the copy that I own....

den said...

Richard Corben, stands among us like an extraterrestrial peak. He has sat in his throne for a long time, above the moving and multi-coloured field of world comics, like an effigy of the leader, a strange monolith, a sublime visitor, a solitary enigma.
Moebius.
I think Moebius capture the essence of Corben's work better than anyone.These lines draws strange pictures in my mind that comes from both the universes these giants created.(Corben thankfully still does).

Troy Z said...

Thank you for posting this! I saw two pages of this in that exact "Complete Book of Cartooning" when I was a child, and by far they were the most... transfixing of all the images in there. They were the perfect balance of horrifically frightening and seductively compelling to my prepubescent psyche, alternately making me flee from the grotesque imagery and insidiously begging my return to witness the horror. I don't think it would fail to have the identical impact on new viewers today; that is, ushering them along into an inevitable path of the appreciation of the Horror genre. Bless you, Mr. Corben, for scarring me in all the right ways.

Gabriel said...

When i was a kid, i didn't like Corben's work because i thought that the way he drew faces was too weird. what i dumb little snot i was. Now, i can't get enough of him.