Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Extraordinario dedicado al Terror!

One of the best things about producing this blog over the years is meeting incredible people from all corners of the world, as well as all over the wonderful world wide web. A great example of this is Pedro Sánchez Lancharro from Valencia, Spain, who was generous enough to not only write to me about THOIA, but to also send me these super awesome scans from the March 1958 issue of Tio Vivo humor magazine--which I'm happy to report is dedicated to all things totally TERROR! Take a glimpse at these hilarious, monster madness highlights, featuring some of the most insanely fun 50's artwork I've ever posted! Spooks, ghouls, vampires, and witches-- it's all here! I can't thank Pedro enough for sharing these outrageous pages with us, and in light of our recent "something different" theme around here, for me anyway, todays post is most certainly the highpoint with this concept. Enjoy-- and once more, thank you, Pedro!!!



























18 comments:

Mestiere said...

"He's an American vampire, he only sucks Coca-Cola" —Page nine.

Tiovivo is subtitled "humor weekly for grown ups" but it's pretty silly humor. It's what you could get away with under a Fascist dictatorship. Spain was a dictatorship under El Generalísimo Francisco Franco (1892-1975), former ally of Hitler and Mussolini. Franco was a monster responsible for the devastation of Spain during the Spanish Civil War and also of something called The White Terror, the execution of several hundred thousand people during the years following the war. His regime was obsessed with limpieza social (social cleansing) which included the extermination of "enemies of the state" and the reeducation of their children. Spain is full of mass graves. My family and I lived in Spain for a few years during the late sixties and early seventies when I was a little kid. By then Spain's economy was the fastest growing in Europe and there had been quite a bit of liberalization. But government censorship might not allow a boxer to appear shirtless in a newspaper. They would retouch the photo adding a shirt. Here is a brief video showing some examples of Francoist censorship. Tyranny fears humor and doesn't like people having a good time.

Morbid said...

I would imagine that Paul Naschy might have picked this up and read it when new.

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

For me it is a pleasure to have shared this comic with you (we also call comics in Spain) and consequently with all your readers. Well consider this blog source of joy for all lovers of terror. It is fair to correspond also all your work overturned here sharing what is in my hand. On the other hand it is exciting for me to make known to some of the comic artists of my country that I admire the most. In the case of this publication is Escobar, Peñarronya, Conti, Cifré and Giner. These artists worked before TioVivo for the Bruguera publishing house, the most famous of its time. But they considered themselves exploited and limited artistically so they decided to embark on an adventure to the Margin of Bruguera. This is how TioVivo was born. Unfortunately they were not successful and had to return to Bruguera, who still maintained the publication TioVivo. Do not doubt that all material that falls into my hands I will share it with you. Thank you.

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

Sorry where you put in my country we also call comics the way to call them is tebeos.

Mr. Karswell said...

Excellent information, Pedro-- thanks a million! Always looking forward to more stuff from you and from Spain's 1950's cartoon art masters! 😊

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

On the other hand Editorial Bruguera was a great quarry for many cartoonists who created mythical characters that still remain in the memory of many Spaniards. I emphasize in the gloomy tone of this blog to for example Doña Urraca.

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

It is very likely since Naschy made illustrations and sketches used for his own films.

JMR777 said...

Viva Pedro! Thanks a million and one! While I never had the knack for languages I could still get the idea of what was going on in these humorous horrors.

Thank you Pedro for providing these horror images and thank you Karswell for posting these. It is interesting to see how horror is perceived in different cultures and how horror can be done humorously outside of the US.

Guy Callaway said...

Fantastic, Karswell & Pedro!!
This looks like a Spanish take on 'Mad' magazine?
And yes, Mestiere, Franco wasn't known for his sense of humor.

anthrax2525 said...

Thank you for giving us a look at Spain's morbid silliness, Pedro!

Brian Barnes said...

Thank you Pedro, this is great stuff I would never see otherwise. Even through the language barrier, the humor comes through and the cartoonish monsters are lively and animated. There's even good girl art in there!

Mr. Cavin said...

Wow, this stuff is fantastic! Thank you Pedro (and Karswell, of course). I've never heard of most of these artists, and yet I can tell that Cifré and Peñarronya are destined to become favorites. The former draws an especially fine Conde Drácula, and the latter's colophon page illustrations are maybe my pick for the bunch. Now I have to cruise on over to the rest of the internet so I can do a little more research.

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

In general the entire Bruguera factory is wonderful. The cartoonists Francisco Ibañez and Vázquez are also highly recommended.

Pedro Sánchez Lancharro said...

Thank you all for your comments. I'm really excited. I hope to continue contributing publications of interest.

Mestiere said...

When I saw fourteen pages of comics in Spanish in the era of "build-the-wall" I was thrown. Are there enough people here who can read that? If the answer was no there might be no comments. But if there were, then they couldn't fail to notice that the humor is very, very lame. Remember, this is a humor magazine for adults. Since I love Spain and the Spanish I became defensive. I didn't want people believing that Spanish humor was that weak. Everything in the comic could be happening in any generic country. There is very little Spanish slang (from Spain) meaning it could be from any of the twenty Spanish speaking countries. Nothing criticizing the government or the church (when I was there people used the word cura, "priest", as an insult).

As it turns out, the art alone was enough to please the readers. Spanish artists are terrific. You have already seen their work in dozens and dozens of Warren magazines.

This original version of Tío Vivo failed. All the original five artists were gone within a year. All five—Escobar, Peñarroya, Conti, Cifré and Giner—had been in the losing side of the civil war. The magazine was eventually bought by Editorial Bruguera and revamped. It's that second version that most people remember.

Mr. Karswell said...

Fantastic art will always be enough for me. Hell, half of the American precode stuff I post here is nothing but crap writing and lame cliches, but that's another reason we love this stuff so much.

To the art! *clink!

JMR777 said...

..."they couldn't fail to notice that the humor is very, very lame."

In magazines for adults, especially from the fifties and sixties, humor ranged from the sophisticated to the very, very lame, but all humor is welcome humor even if the jokes are on the corny side.


anthrax2525 said...

The jokes may barely rise above the level of a cocktail napkin, but the art, now that's the payoff.