Monday, December 16, 2013

Whence Stalked the Werewolf

Tale number two from the August 1971 issue of Nightmare #5, a hairy yarn with an ending that's a whole lot more predictable than the twist in the previous Skywald post. Speaking of, a few of you mentioned first seeing Slime World when it was reprinted in the pages of the Psycho Yearbook #1 "best of" --and todays story may also have you also screaming deja vu as it was reprinted in their Nightmare Yearbook #1, three years later in 1974. Anyway, nice 'n slick artwork here from Carlos Garzon, obviously working from photos to give it that extra realistic look.








6 comments:

Dr. Theda said...

Nightmare #5 had a Story about a shape-shifting Slime... Could you please post that Story good Sir Karswell....
These horror comics (Skywald)( think it was "Nightmare" )... a twisted Alice in Wonderland... been wanting to see these two stories again since we were a small kid....

Brian Barnes said...

Skywald was fashionably late to the hypnotic regression party it seems, by about 2 decades!

The story is just poor beyond belief, enough so that it doesn't even take mentioning, but the art is wonderful, and the artists switches between medieval and modern and excels at both. The last panel is a real treat, especially the light framing.

BTW, as far as I remember, they didn't have high heels, split dresses and fishnets in 1880! They didn't have werewolves, either, though, so I guess it's a wash.

brandiweed said...

I was half-expecting some weird Jack the Ripper twist in this.

Mestiere said...

Colombian artist Carlos Garzón had arrived in New York just the year before and might not have had access to reference photos of nineteenth century outfits. He might also have been in a little bit of a rush, judging by that incredibly fragile door on the last page.

Alternating settings and timelines so brusquely in such a short story might not have been a good idea.

Trevor Markwart said...

You know what I love about these stories so far? It's that the artists are knocking themselves out to try and "sell" these stories! They're working for some bargain basement publisher, crappy writing by somebody's nephew maybe, and they're really TRYING. Sort of like Bela Lugosi in his latter career.

Yes, not the greatest of stories, but it is interesting in its somewhat unique spin. I haven't read a werewolf past life hypnosis regression story before. Sadly the concept itself in comic book short story form means that the ending is telegraphed and predictable beyond nearly anything else. This might have the makings of a longer format. What happens after the wolf is let out of the bag, so to speak. That might be interesting.

Thanks for posting!

Grant said...

I can't help liking this one, but for the story as much as the art. I usually like these hypnotic regression stories, including the ones presented as true stories (I'm usually on the fence about whether they're true or not). As Brian Barnes mentions, that started some time before this story (I guess most people consider the "Bridey Murphy" story the big start of it).