Sunday, March 24, 2013

Bury Us Not!

You are now cordially invited to check out the remaining tale from the May 1952 issue of Strange Mysteries #5 (see the previous two posts as well as Blood of the Zombie buried deep in the 2009 THOIA Archive.) Yes, another full issue put to rest! We can keep this Iger Shop Fest going all month if you want, I've got a million of 'em...









7 comments:

Mestiere said...

What a strange and quirky story! I was surprised that they used the ongoing conflict in Korea as a trigger for the desire to commit suicide. That would seem a little too current, too real. I realized that I didn't know what was going to happen, and really wanted the protagonist to survive.

I liked it. This one is a winner!

Brian Barnes said...

This is an entertaining mess. It makes one terrible writing mistake; I was much more interested in how our evil doctor got away with murder than our heroine surviving. I was also interested in how he managed to teleport from location to location mid-sentence in page 3, and his ability to materialize desks and cigarettes out of nowhere.

Page 2, Panel 2 in current times would start a pretty big flame war on certain comment boards :)

BTW, cops can't get enough of "traveller from a strange land" when calling in a suicide where the entry wound was obviously from a couple feet above the body! They laugh and laugh at that!

Mr. Cavin said...

Hey alright! Luke Cage! You don't see interracial marriages depicted in these fifties comics all that often--they probably only got away with it since he's a sheet-white ghost now. Actually, come to think of it, they forgot to color a lot of this story.

Mestiere said...

The story is no better than other stories, but I reacted a little differently because suicide is such a big issue in the U.S. Military. It's not only sky high among veterans but it's also higher than average among the spouses of veterans, something many people don't know. Zombies an vampires are not real, but suicide is. When the story started as a black comedy about a suffering war widow who couldn't commit suicide (she couldn't buy poison, she couldn't get a gun) I though that she may end up dying an ironic or "funny" death ("look, she wanted to die and slipped on a banana peel"). I realized I didn't want to see that. But then the story turned into a crime story and then into a ghost story. So it was a little unpredictable. The happy ending was a little deus ex machina, but I'm okay with that.

Phantom of Pulp said...

Some very prescient themes here.

Fascinating.

There's ALWAYS more than meets the eye in these pre-code offerings.

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

Not for the first time, we see a comic-book artist who did a much better job of drawing women than of drawing, well, anything else. Especially nice job on her hair.

Anonymous said...

Not enough comic stories end with phone calls from ghosts.