Saturday, November 5, 2011

Never Call a Ghost

John Forte's contribution to the May 1953 issue of Beware #15 is a goofball ghost pirate tale (did you know that ghosts can't cross a running brook?!), and in keeping with the theme of the rest of this issue, it's alot more funny than it is scary. Two more stories to go from this one, and it only gets goofier from here on in...






9 comments:

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

Yeah, that was a screwy story, but the imputation of special power to water and especially to moving water isn't an invention of its author. I've elsewhere encountered the notion that it constrains ghosts, and it obstructs Stoker's Dracula, so that the count has to cross a gang-plank when the tide is moving neither in nor out.

Karswell said...

I knew about vampires and water, but never heard it affected ghosts.

FrankFay said...

I've encountered several stories where witches can't cross running water.

Not a bad story- a bit goofy in spots but nicely drawn.

Anonymous said...

Vampires, ghosts, unicorns, whatever! It's all hilariously stupid fun. What the hell was that bit about the ghost not being able to "stand bright lights?" Where was that supposed go, and why didn't it ever get there? It's almost like an ADD kid wrote this. Still, you can't fault Forte's great artwork. That guy was incredible, and so, so underrated.

And that lettering is gorgeous!

Psychonator said...

I like the last panel. "The Dev..."

Reminds me of "He who must not be named!"

The skelton wraiths in the seance look too cool.

Daniel [oeconomist.com] said...

Here's a potentially useful Google book search:

    ghost "cross running water"

Karswell said...

The more I look at Forte's work here, the more I like it too... there's lots more by him in the THOIA Archive, use the search engine! Thanks for the comments, it's good to know that blog commentors can cross water!

Speaking of water, got some more coming up here next-- extra swampy style!

Mr. Cavin said...

Those swirly skeletons and ghosts on page two are pretty damn cool, man. As for the line about bright lights, I thought it was pretty obvious that he took the pirate to the brightly-lit place in the following panel hoping that it wouldn't be able to join him in the well-lit building, a plan that backfired because he kept trying to pass out-of-date money. I sort of liked the buddy comedy vibe of this one. I think it might make a really cool little retro road picture--Paul Reubens and Johnny Depp are a wealthy, but cash-poor, "mixed lifestyle" duo on the run from the Dev. Some mistake of identity would probably mean they had to dress up like women and get a job on a cruise ship.

Anonymous said...

(I originally had a longer post); but I'll just ask: Why does a *1850's* pirate dress like, say, more of a *1750's (1)* one? (I.e. shouldn't he dress more like, say, *Abe Lincoln than Blackbeard*?

1. Did the stereotypical "pirate dress" ever reflect any real world fashion?

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