Friday, September 5, 2014

Destiny

Some terrific moments in this one, courtesy of the bold, no bullshit art stylings of Joe Certa. From the June 1953 issue of Harvey Comics' Black Cat #44.






8 comments:

Mestiere said...

How are you recovering from your close encounter with those eighteen wasps, Karswell? Hopefully you are doing well.

Perhaps the story would have been more satisfying if we knew why Matt Buckett was imprisoned. The story doesn't say that he escaped from death row. Had he been convicted of murder? Because if he wasn't then he didn't deserve to die and the whole cat and mouse game seems unnecessarily cruel and unfair.

I like the surreality of the story and the art was very good.

Brian Barnes said...

The negative space with all the bricks -- from the haunted areas to the prison -- is pretty unique for this time period, as far as I've seen.

Did anybody notice the trick with the guards? One wonders if that was in the script or the artist just did it himself.

Trevor Markwart said...

Joe Certa is like a 1970's underground comix artist working in the 1950's. Strong and attention grabbing. Thanks for posting.

Karswell said...

Better, of the 18 stings, 3 ate still bothering me a bit and got infected so now I'm on an anti biotic for that-- but much better. The grass is quite tall still, haha... thanks for asking :)

Karswell said...

I agree with you guys, Certa is somewhat overlooked... maybe I'll pull a few more of his stories for more of a looksee in the coming posts

Mr. Cavin said...

I'd love to see more. Honestly, I'd love to see the originals. Certa must grip his brush in an angry fist. These are some very florid and expressive marks.

Also the Elias cover on this ish is one of my favorite pre-code covers of all. Black Cat Mysteries nearly always had great covers.

Grant said...

I've seen some trigger-happy police and prison guards in these stories, but those two take the prize. There's almost no way the writer could have been remotely sympathetic with them. In fact, the artist makes them as unpleasant-looking as possible. Not "grizzled" prison guards, but instead, just plain weird-looking.

Mestiere said...

Grant said: "There's almost no way the writer could have been remotely sympathetic with [the prison guards]. In fact, the artist makes them as unpleasant-looking as possible. Not "grizzled" prison guards, but instead, just plain weird-looking."

The prison guards were drawn with the same faces as the two Grim Reapers on page two, panel three.