Thursday, May 1, 2014

Son of Dracula (PART ONE)

Kicking off May with the first in a cool two-part post from the one and only issue of FRIGHT from Atlas Comics-- it's Son of Dracula #1 (aka And Unto Dracula Was Born a Son), published in August 1975. It's a comic that seemed to have some real potential, nicely written by Gary Friedrich and of course Frank Thorne's art is always jaw dropping, sinister, and sexy. A real shame it all ended just as the blood curdling fun was beginning.

PART TWO coming up in our next post! Click HERE!












4 comments:

Mestiere said...

Great art! Can't wait to find out how Dracula Jr. survives without food or water.

Did you know that young blood can cure multiple sclerosis, heart hypertrophy, rejuvenate the liver and improve skin healing? At least in mice. The catch is that you would need to share your circulatory system with a young person. I wonder if regular transfusions would be enough to get some of the effect.

Brian Barnes said...

The re-created Atlas was kind of a weird beast. This is a fun story, though it makes absolutely no sense (Friedrich, as much as I love him, was the king of plot over characterization, try to figure out why the mother did anything that she did in this story!) Art is fabulous, but it's hard not to imagine it's their take on Tomb of Dracula.

They even enlisted Throne who's got a bit of Colan in him.

Atlas did so many riffs of Marvel stuff, but they usually had an interesting twist here or there. I've never seen this, so thanks for posting it! Can't wait for part 2!

Mr. Cavin said...

Thorne is so interesting in comics code mode; it's not something I've spent much time exploring. His work is still very baroque and lurid, but there something about it--some scratchy line quality, or even exploded stroke weights--that feels much sketchier than the usual. I think Dracula's little red devil ring is hilarious.

Grant said...

So far it reminds me of that pretty entertaining early ' 70s movie GRAVE OF THE VAMPIRE, with Michael Pataki as the vampire and William Smith as the son.

It also reminds me of a story in Eerie # 48 (I mean the Warren magazine Eerie), except that in that story Dracula genuinely falls for the girl he takes back to his castle, so he doesn't refrain from biting her just because of some long-term plan, let alone go back on his word later on.