Friday, June 19, 2009

The Two Who Were Alone! / Joe…

Here’s a couple different sort of nail biters for you from the Dec. ’51 issue of Adventures into Terror #7, the first story from Allen Bellman and the second from Hy Rosen. This is a good all-around issue, also featuring neat Joe Maneely and Harry Lazarus yarns, but most notably containing Basil Wolverton’s classic “Where Monsters Dwell” that we posted way back in October '07 from one of the numerous re-print versions… click HERE for it!





+++++++++++++++++++++

Vintage AD



+++++++++++++++++++++++

Joe...







STILL TO COME IN JUNE: More murderous mayhem, giant bugs, haunted houses, zombies, requests fulfilled, and much much more! June is ALL ATLAS Month at THOIA-- drop me a line and let me know what you think! Your feedback in IMPORTANT!

10 comments:

Mr. Cavin said...

I really liked he second story today a whole lot. The art was kind of dull and awkward, but had occasional glimpses of solid comic timing, actually (like that panel when Jane has her heart attack between Larry's legs a la the Graduate). The writing was very effective, however, at least up till the last page. I really found myself caring about Larry and his girl. The fifth panel on page four was really sort of devastating.

Thanks, Karswell.

Anonymous said...

The second story had art that was reminiscent of Harvey Kurtzman.

Karswell said...

I apologize in the delay of posts this week, took a quick lil trip to southern MO for a few days and didn't have time to prepare beforehand. I'll have another creepy double header up before the weekend is done though. I appreciate the couple comments so far but come on, let's see some more chit chat around here too! My statcounter tells me your here, I can see you, why not at least say something? It's more interesting that way, ya know?

goblin said...

Two great tales today.

I wasn't too keen on the art in 'The Two Who Were Alone' and the ending was rather predictable, but it was still a very atmospheric story.

'Joe…' I thought was inspired through and through. The idea of some sort of invisible creature that obeyed your every word even if you didn't really mean it is just terrifying. The art was kind of lacking in places, but I dug the facial expressions.

Atlas Month has been great so far and I'm curious to see what's coming up next. Thanks again for everything, Karswell.

Anonymous said...

I CAN ALWAYS TELL THE EARLIER ATLAS STUFF FROM THE LATER STUFF BECAUSE THE WRITING SEEMS BETTER BUT THE ART THOUGH STILL REALLY GOOD ISNT AS SLICK.......... NO MATTER BOTH WERE COOL AND VERY ORIGINAL STORIES.

I WOULD HAVE COMMENTED SOONER BUT I JUST GOT BACK FROM VACATION TOO! THANKS KARS!!!!

prof. grewbeard said...

re: Joe.... it's funny, that little trick works for me too. unfortunately it's inconsistent...

8thRay said...

It's interesting how the broken leg on page 2 becomes a broken arm (without a hand at the end of it, oddly enough) in the flashback on page 6.

Anonymous said...

two scary stories with great art ahhhh...what more could a ghoul ask for? refried brains? joe is one cool dude hope he hangs around for a while before my head splits. oh shit!! later.

Radiation Cinema! said...

Karswell: Thanks for the post. Loved the first story and felt a real shiver when the curtains began to fade on their own. Great concept, how everything just begins to rot because the house hates life. I was not aware of Mort Larwence, but he certainly was spectacular and very cinematic. As you say, what a splash page! -- Mykal

Horror pariah said...

The first story is quite good for such a short story. I'd be tempted to use the phrase 'short n' sweet', but.....

I think I've mentioned it before when commenting on another story, but 'Joe' is one of the most effectively creepy and creative stories of the era. I bet a lot of kids watched their mouths for months.