Sunday, June 16, 2013

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12 comments:

Turok1952 said...

A thousand thousand thanks fur disse! KIng Kirby is my favorite! He always has been! Thus ever shall it be!

Mestiere said...

A single entity manifesting itself through multiple bodies. An unusual enough concept that it took me until page four to figure it out. I guess that had Francie married Hugan she really would have married the whole family.

I wonder if Hugo was Kirby's first macrocephalic creature, like Modok and The Misfit from Kamandi.

I loved this story! You can't go wrong with Kirby!

Anonymous said...

Has The Digital Comics Museum site been taken down?

Karswell said...

I have no idea, I never use it

Turok1952 said...

No, MestiƩre, no...there is a macrocephalic Kirby-Simon creation named Marto in Blue Bolt #6 from November 1940.
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I was really surprised when I saw Marto. He looks like Mardok but with wheels rather than levitation.

I love it when we find out things like this. Another example is the Kirby critter Gorgilla from Tales to Astonish (#12 in 1960 and #18 from 1961) aand the creature Gorro from Captain America #4 in 1941.

These connections are priceless!

Brian Barnes said...

This is an interesting variation on the "talking to somebody in a dark room, and then turn on the lights." There's a number of these, and some are pretty well know (and all presented on this blog!)

This one goes on after the reveal, which makes it a bit special, but also robs it a bit of it's impact. The rest of the story explains what's going on instead of cluing you into it before and then you go "ah-ha" at the big head.

Kirby loved big heads. Loved them. They are all throughout his career. Everybody remembers Modok, but also forgets that Arnim Zola is just another take on that. Kirby was great at expressions and especially evil looking, craggy faces. It was the perfect creature for him.

Mr. Cavin said...

The last panel of page five is lovely, and I really like the fact that one presumably had to turn the page for the reveal. The story would feel a lot hokier without the lengthy denouement--this really is a long way to go for what is essentially a silly visual pun--that turns it into an uncomfortable tragedy about mob mentality and outcasts. I usually think that high-concept storytelling like this needs to get around to the gimmick as early as possible to have a shot at any emotional weight. I think the fact that the meaningful story here comes after the punchline was a good choice.

Mestiere said...

Thanks, Turok 1952, I didn't know about Marto. Wow, 1940! Kirby had a lot of his better ideas early and then he milked them for all they were worth. Not that there's anything wrong with that!

Brian Barnes said...

@Mr. Cavin: You could still do that and save the reveal, after the "gasp/choke" woman looking in the door, have the townsfolk burst in and shoot the family, with some more text about each of the family's "jobs."

Then reveal the head at the end, along with some quick text about "how can a brain survive without it's heart, ears..."

The problem is everything is way over-explained. It robs the story of the "head" (sorry) of steam it was building. That, and maybe it could have done without the misunderstood monster angle. This story lives and dies by the visuals, that seemed like one idea too many.

Fornikate S. said...

This was made into an awful, awful movie. Check it out sometime. Same title.

Mestiere said...

That movie is entirely too similar in concept to the Kirby story not to be "inspired" by it, but I have found no confirmation.

Anonymous said...

Kirby's Black Magic + gratuitous nudity = Charles Band.

Actually the film is entertaining if you go into it with the proper expectations.